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Property of OISE/UT Library 
Please return to 252 Bloor St. West 
Attention: Kathy Irnrie 



Qne rone 



THE ONTARIO READERS 

PRIMER 

AUTHORIZED BY 
THE IIINISTER OF EDUCATION 

PRICE 4 CENTS 

TORONTO 
o 
.T. EATO N C ,i,,,i,,o 



Copyright, Canada. 1920. hy 
THE ,,IINISTER OF EDUCATION" FOR ON'TARIO 



PREFACE 

THIS PRIMER is simply a reading book. If bas been pre- 
pared, as far as possible, in accordance with the collective 
views oF the teachers of the Province. Since opinions 
differ widely as fo the best methods of teaching children 
fo read, a new Manual on Primary leading bas been 
larelaared, which indicates fully and clearly how the Primer 
may be used by the advocates of each of the prevailing 
methods of teaching. Ail teachers should read the new 
Manual careïully before they introduce the Primer fo their 
classes. 



a l)eart 



PRIMER 1 



2 PRIM_ER 



PRIMER 3 



4 lRIME R 



PRIMER 5 



6 PRIMER 



PRIMEtt "/ 



8 PRI[ER 



PRIMEI 9 

red dog bake littlc 

you will sortie fotlnd 

Who called the cat ? 

Who will help the hen ? 

Will you get the flour? 

Did the chicks eat bread? 



10 PRIER 

I see I can He has 

Do you It is I ara 

I can see the pig. 

He bas somc wheat. 

It is my whcat. 

Who ara I? Do you see? 



PRIMER 

This little pig went fo mal'kc(. 
This little pig stayed at home. 
This littlc pig had toast bcef. 
o 
This littlc pig had llOllC. 
This little pig said, 
All the way home. 

Rain, rain, go away, 
Corne again somc other day,. 
Little Tommy wants to play. 
Rain, tain, go away. 



12 PRIMER 

HUSIPT¥ DUMPTY 

Humpty Duml»ty sat on the wall, 
IIumpty Dumpty had a great fall. 
All the King's horses, 
And all the King's men, 
Couldn't l)ick Humpty Dumpty 
u l) again. 

Little Jack IIorner sa in a corner, 
Eating Christmas pie; 
II e put in his thumb 
And pulled out a plum, 
And said, "What a good boy ara I." 



PRIMER 13 

JACK A2qD JILL 
Jack and Jill /  
Went up the bill 
To get a pail of water ; 
Jack fell down  
And brokc his crown, 

And 
Jill 
came 
tumbling 
after. 

There were two robins, 
In an old tree top. 
Onc was callcd Pip, 
The other called Pop. 
Fly away, Pip. 
Fly away, Pop. 
Corne back, Pip. 
Corne back, Pop. 



14 

PRIMER 

THE WID 

Who has seen the wind ? 
Xeither you nor I; 
But when the leaves hang 
trembling, 
The wind is passing by. 

Who has seen the wind ? 
Xeither I nor you; 
But when the trees bow down 
their heads, 
The wind is passing through. 



PRIMER 

15 

HUSH A BYE 

Hush a bye baby 
On the tree top, 
When the wind blows, 
The cradle will rock. 

When the bough breaks, 
The cradle will fall, 
Down tumbles baby, 
Bough, cradle, and all. 



16 PRI[EI 

Little Boy Blue, 
Corne blow your horn. 
The shecp arc in the mcadow, 
The cows are in the corn. 
Whcrc is the littlc boy 
Who looks after the sheep ? 
He is under he haystaek, 
Fast asleep. 

This is Little Boy Blue. 
docs hot ste thc sheep 
and the cows. 
Whcre are the sheep ? 
Whcrc are the cows? 
Corne, Little Boy Blue, 
Wake up and blow your horn. 



PRIMER 17 
THE HORN 
0no upon  timo thor as a horn. 
It livod in  toy sho. 
itD Littl 7o Z 
It wcnt out of tDc sDop and 
"ood mornhll," said tDe druni. 
"Whcrc arc you going?" 
"I ara going to play wih Little 
Boy Bluc. Will you corne too?" 
said thc horn. 
"Yes, I will," said the drum. 
So thc horn and the drum went to 
find Little Boy Blue. 



18 PRIMER 

Soon they met u gun. "Where 
are you going ?" said the gun. "To 
play with Little Boy Blue," said the 
horn and the drum. "Will you 
corne too ?" 
"Yes, I will," said the gun. 
So the horn and the drum and 
the gun went to find Little Boy 
Blue. Boy Blue was under the 
haystack, fast asleep. 
" Who will wake him ?" said the 
horn. 
"I will," suid the drum. 
"I will," said the gun. 
"No, I will," said the horn; and 
it blew so loudly thut up jumped 
Little Boy Blue. 
And the horn und the drum and 
the gun played with him ull duy. 



PRIMER 
LITTLE BO-PEEP 
Little 
Bo-Peep 
Has 
lost 
her 
And eannot tell 
LeaveWherethem_t° find, them. 
morte, 
and they will eome 
home, 
And bring/heir tails 
Behind/hem. 

This little girl is Bo-Peep. 
Do you see her sheep ? 
Where are the sheep ? 
The sheep are lost. 
Little Bo-Peep cannot 
find them. 
What will little Bo-Peep do ? 



0 PRIMER 

OUR FLAG 

This is our flag. 
It is the Union Jack. 
The flag is red, white, and blue. 
The red says, "Be brave!" 
The white says, "Be pure l" 
The blue says, "Be truc!" 
Our soldiers fought 
for this flag in the Great War. 



PRIMER 21 

FIOE LITTLE BIRDS 

We are little birds. 
0ne, two, three, four, rive. 
We are rive little birds. 
Five little birds can fly. 
Five little birds can sing. 
0ne little bird sings, 
"How do you do ?" 
And one little bird sings, 
"I like you..ï 

And one little bird sings, 
"A crust, if you please." 
And one little bird sings, 
"I like cheese." 
And one little bird sings, 
"South we must fly." 
So one, two, three, four, rive 
Little birds sang, 
"Good-bye, good-bye." 



PRIMER 

One, two, three, four little ducks, 
and two little chickens. 

One little chicken peeps, 
"How do you do ?" 

And one little duck quacks, 
"I'll chase you!" 

Another little duck quacks, 
"Hear me talk 

Another little duck 
"Sec me walk!" 

Another little duck quacks, :'4' 
"'atch me swim!" \, t,/!;II 

And one little chicken peeps, 
"Don't go in!" 



PRIMER 23 

See the people runningl 
Why are they running? 
They are shouting, too. 
What arc tlley shouting? 
Oh, hear the bells ringingl 
What is the marrer ? 
Why, don't you know? It is a fireI 
Look I There it is, down therel 
Here conles the tire engine. 
How fast the horses go! 
Let us go, too. 



24 PRIMER 

-1 

WHO .[ I? 

You may hear me call, 
but no ont has evcr seen me. 
I fly kites for boys. 
I play with the leaves. 
I seatter the seeds of plants. 
I rock the bird in ber nest. 
I move clouds across the sky. 
I toss ships on the sea. 
I ara now hot, now eold. 
I ara now strong, now weak. 
Who ara I? 



THE HORSE £-,'D THE GOOSE 

This is a horse and this is a goose. 
The horse looks at the goose. 
Thc goose looks at the horse. 
Thc goose speaks fo the horse. 
This is what she says: 
• 'I ara better than you. 
I can walk on the grom,l like 
I ean fly in the air like a bird. 
I can swim in the water like a 
fish. 
I ara as good as a horse. 
I ara as good as a bird. 
I ara as good as a fish." 



26 PRIMER 

This is what the horse says 
to the goose: 
"It is truc .--- 
You can walk on the ground. 
You can fly in thc air. 
¥ou can swim in the water. 
But--- 
You cannot walk as well as a. 
hrsc. 
You cannot fly as well as a bird. 
]'ou cannot swim as well as a 
fish 
I cannot tir in the air. 
I cannot swim in thc water. 
But, 
I tan walk well upon the ground. 
And I wouhl rather do one/hing 
well than be a goose in more 
ways than one I" 
Translated from FIRS'r 
1-'; FNCHBGULEy 
By special permission of 
-1 w'ard Arnold 



PRIMER 27 

THE LITTLE PLA_NT 

In the heart of a seed, 
Buried deep, so deep, 
A dear little plant 
Lay fast asleep. 

"Wake[" said the sunshine, 
"And creep to thc light." 
"Wakc!" said the voice 
Of the raindrops bright. 

The little plant heard, 
And it rose to see 
What the wonderful worl,l 
Outside might be. 
K. L. Baown 



28 PRIMER 

lIY LITTLE GARDEN 

I have a little garden, 
And every summer day 
I dig it well, and rake it well, 
And pull the wceds away. 

have a little garden, 
And every SUlnlner night 
water ail the pretty flowers, 
And wateh them with deliht. 
my little garden 
I have a little walk; 
take my sisters by the hand, 
-knd there we go and talk. 

Busy bees corne humming by, 
To gather honey sweet; 
And singing birds look in to see 
What they ean get to eat 



PRIMER 29 

"This stocking is full," said 
Santa Claus 
".ks fui] as it can ho." 
A moule sat licking his little pavs, 
Tot far from the Christmas tree. 

He saw and heard old 
Santa Claus, 
Then he ran across the floor 



PRIMER 

And said, "Just let me try, 
because , 
I'm sure I can put in more. 
01d Santa Claus laughed and 
shook his head, 
"You cannot do ]t, I know;" 
But mousie gnawed and gnawed 
and gnawed, 
And put a hole in the toe. 

THE CHILD .4\D THE STA_H 

Bright little star, 
Shining afar, 
Tell me, I pray, 
What means ('hristmas Day ? 
Christmas, my ehild. 
IS a son from above, 
The sweet, happy song 
Of God's great love. 



PRIMER 31 
THE URELLA 
The rain ]s raning all around, 
It falls on field and tree, 
It rains on the umbrellas here, 
And on the shps af sea. 

It is raining all around. 
Who has an umbrella? 
"I bave," said the lark; 
And he flew under a leaf. 



32 PRIMER 

"I have," said the spider; 
And he crept under  stone. 
'I hare," said the bee 
And he weng into a flower bell. 

"I don't want one," said the goose; 
And she tan out into the tain. 



PRIMER 

OLD 5[OTHER ttUBBARD 

Old Mother Hul)bard 
Went to thc cul)board 
To gct hcr 1)oor dog a bone; 
But whcn she got there, 
The cupboard was bare, 
And so the poor dog had nonc. 

She went to the hatter's 
To buy him a hat; 
But when she came back, 
He was feeding the cat. 



34 PRIMER 

. .....ï  ,..,.&31. 
She went to the tailor's 
To buy him a coat; 
But when she came back, 
He was riding a goat. 

The dame ruade a curtsy, 
The dog ruade a bow; 

The dame said, 
The dog said, 

"Your servant," 
  B ow-wow.  



PRIMER 35 

IVISHES 

Said the first little chicken, 

With a sad little sigh, 
"I wish I eould find 
A little fat fly." 

Said the next little chicken, 
 With an odd little shrug, 
"I wish I could find 
$',g,l'"oE fat little bug." 
Said the third little chicken, 
With a sharp little squeak, OEç£4 9 
I wsh I eould feel ,4-4" 
Some eorn in my beak.'" -.. 
Said the fourth little chicken, 
 With a small sigh of grief, 
"I wish I could find 
A fat worm on a leaf." 



86 

PRIMER 

.« " said the mother, 
'See bore, 
From the green garden patch, 
"If you want things to eat, 
Just corne here and scratch." 

The cow has a horn, and the fish 
bas a gill ; 
The horse has a hoof, and the duck 
has a bill; 
The car bas a paw, and the dog 
bas a rail ; 
And the bird has a wing that on high 
i t may sail. 



PRIMER 37 

There once was  mouse 
Who lived.in a shoe, 
And  snug little bouse 
He ruade of it, too; 
He had a front door 
To take in the cheese, 
And a hole in the toc 
To slip out, if you please. 

There are roses 
 that grow on a vine, 
:There re roses 
 that grow on a tree, 
-/"---* But my little Rose 
grows on ten little toes, 
And she is the rose for me. 



PRIMER 

Well, old doggie. I have corne 
to talk to you. 
Shake hands. Give me your paw. 
Say, "IIow do you do ?" 
Why can't you talk to me ? 
When I tell you to talk, 
you only bark. 
But you arc  good doggie. 
I like your white nose. 
My kitty bas a white nose, too. 
But why is your nose so cold? 
This is my little kitty. 
Why can't you talk to us ? 



PRIMEI 39 

TILE LITTLE II.kI.NDIIOPS 

Oh I Where do you corne from, 
You little drops of tain, 
Pitter, patter, pitter, patter, 
Down the window-panc ? 

Tell me, little raindrops, 
Is that the way you play, 
Pitter, patter, pitter, patter, 
All the rainy day ? 

The little raindrops cannot speak, 
But "pitter, patter, pat," 
5Ieans, "we can play on this side, 
't 
Why can you play on that ?" 



40 PRIMER 

TtIE tRAIN 

It is rainingl It is raining! 
Who likes the rain? 
The little duek laughs and ays, 
• "I-[ love the rainI" 

The little girl says, 
• "I do hot like the tain. 
Thc rain spoils my dress." 
Sec the little girl 
under her umbrella. 
She runs as fast as she ean 
to the house. 



PRIMER 41 

"I like the rain l" 
says the little boy. 
He is running to school. 
He has hot an umbrella, 
but he bas a big coat. 
He likes water. He likes rain. 
He is like the little duck, 
who laughs and says, 
"I love the rain 
Translated from 
IN FRENCH--BAGULEY 
By special permission of 
lward Arnold 



42 PRIMER 

THE CLEOER DOG 

One day a little dog was playing 
on the road, when a sharp nail ran 
into his paw. 
His toaster was a doetor's son, 
and he took the dog fo his father. 
The doetor drew the nail out, 
washed the paw, and tied it up. 
The next day the little dog 
was playing with a big one. 
A sharp stick tan into the paw 
of the big dog, and hurt him so 
that he began to howl. 
The little dog eoaxed the big one 
to go with him at once to the doetor 
who had helped him the day before. 
The good doetor was able to help 
the big dog, too. 
Was he hot a clever little dog? 



PRIMER 43 

THE VISE FOX 
One day u lion sat at the door of 
his cve. He sw  dog passing by. 
"Corne in, my friend, and visit 
me for  while," he said. 
The dog was proud to have the lion 
spek fo him. 
He went in, but never came out. 
Soon after, a bear passed that way. 
The lion said fo him, "Corne in and 
make me  little visit, Mr. Ber." 
The bear went in, but never 
came out. 
A wolf was wlking by, and the 
lion asked him in for  visit. 



44 PRIMER 

The wolf said, "Thank you, Sir Lion, 
I shall be pleased to visit you. 
But he nevcr came out. 
iany beasts went into the cave, 
but nonc ever came out. 
One day a fox went to sec the lion. 
"Are 3-ou at home, old lion ?" he said. 
"Corne in, corne in," said thc lion. 
The fox looked down on the 
ground, and saw some tracks on 
the sand. 
"Corne in, corne in," called the lion. 
"Why do )'ou hot corne in? I 
cannot go out to see you. Do 
walk in I" 
"No, thank you," said the fox. 
"I think I will hot corne in to-day. 
I sec some tracks on the sand. 
They all go into the cave. I sec no 
tracks eoming out. I think I will 
walk away. Good-day, old lion !" 



PRIhIER 45 

JACK AND TOM 
(A Dialogue) 
When did you get the dog, Jack ? 
I got him to-day, Tom. 
To-day is my birthday. 
Who gave you the dog? 
Father gave him to me. 
How old are you, Jack ? 
I am seven, Tom. 
Do you go to school? 
Oh, yes! I go to school. 
Do you like school ? 
Yes, I like to go to school. 
Can you read, Jack ? 
I can read a little, Tom. 



46 PRIMER 

What class are you in ? 
I ara in the Primer. 
Is that your Primer in your bag? 
Y es. this is my book. 
Look! I ean read 
Little Ja«.k Horner. 
Little Boy Blue, and 
Littlc Bo-Peep. 

THE LITTLE IIOEBUH 

Good-lnorning, little rosebush, 
I pray thee, tell me true, 
To bc as sweet as a sweet red rose 
What must a body do ? 
To be as sweet as a sweet red rose, 
A little gM like you 
Just grows, and grows, and grows, 
and grows, 
And that's what she must do. 

Job., 



PRIMER 47 

THE TEA-PART¥ 

Let us have a tea-1)arty , Pollyl 
Yes, that will be lovely; " 
Whom shall we ask, Molly ? 
All your dolls, and all my d«dls, 
and the little girl next door. 
Very well, and what shall we bave 
to drink ? 
I like tea the best, and so do 
the dollies, Polly 
But I like coffee the best; 
do let us have coffee, Molly. 
,No, I don't like coffee so much 
as tea. 



48 PRIMER 

But I like it ever so much better; 
can't we bave coffee this rime 
All right! We will have coffee 
this rime, if you like. 
That will be lovely! Shall I go and 
ask the little girl next door? 
Yes, please do; and I will set 
the table. 
So all the dolls, and Molly and Polly 
had a lovely tea-party together. 

LULLA]Y 

Sleep, my baby, sleep and rest 
In your cosy little nest; 
Into dreamland gently go, 
While I sing so sweet and low, 
Lullaby, lullaby, 
Lullaby, my })ab)-. 



PRIMER 49 

T]_E THREE BEARS 

Ont day littlc Goldie-Locks went 
to the woods to pick flowers. 
She walkcd on and on. 
At last shc saw a littlc house. 
It was thc home of three |)ears. 
Father Bcar was ,'t grcat big bcar. 
]Iother Bear was a middle-sized one. 
Baby Bear was a littlc wec bear. 
The bcars had gonc for a walk. 
Goldic-Locks saw thc door was open, 
so she walkcd in to thc kitchen. 
On the table shc saw thrcc bowls 



50 PRIIER 

of soup-a big bowl, a middle-sized 
bowl, and a little wee bowl., 
Goldie-Locks tasted the soup in 
the big bowl. But if was too hot. 
Shc tastcd the soup in the 
middle-sized bowl. But it was too 
cool. 
The soup in the little wee bowl 
was just right, and she took it all 

Goldie-Locks saw three chairs. 
The first was a great big chair. 
The second was a middle-sizcd one. 
The lhir,t was a litlle wee chair. 
Goldie-Locks sut in the grcat 



PRIMER 51 

big chair. But it was too high. 
She sat in the middle-sized 
chair. But it was too wide. 
So she sat in the little 
wee chair. But thc little 
wee chair broke, and dow she fell¢// 
She juml)ed up and ran upstairs. 
There she found three |)eds-- 
a big bed, a middle-sized bed, 
and a little wee bed. 
She lay down on the big bed. 
But if was too hard. 
She lay down on the middle-sized 
bed. But it was too soft. 
So she tried the little wee bcd. 
It was just right, and she soon 
fell fast asleep. [// 
Father Bear, Mother Bear, ald 
Baby Bear came home very hungry. 
They went at once to get their soup. 



52 PRIMER 

Father Bear growled, "Some one 
has been tasting my SOUl)!" 
[othcr Bcar cricd out, "Some 
one bas becn tasting nly soupI" 
Then Baby Bcar said, in his 
little wcc voice, "Some one 
bas bcen tasting my soup, and 
itis all gonc I" 
Then the thréc ])cars wantcd to 
sit down and rest. 
Fathcr Bear growled, "Some one 
bas becn sitting in my chair l" 
Mothcr Bcar cricd out, "Some 
one bas been sitting in my chair!" 
Baby Bear said, " 
_ Olïle oile 
bas ])ecn sitting in my chair, 
and bas broken it!" 
Thc thrce ])cars were very angry. 
Thon thcy went upstairs to bed. 
"Some one bas bcen lying on 



PRIMER 

my bedI" growled Father Bear. 
"Some one has been lying on 
my bedI" cred out Mother Bear. 
"Some one s lying in my bed 
now, and she s ïast asleep !" called 
out Baby Bear. 

Goldie-Loeks woke up, and saw 
the three bears. 
They gave her a great fright. 
She jumped out of the window, 
and ran home as fast as she could. 



54 PRIMER 

LITTLE STAI 

Good-night, little star! 
I must go to my bcd. 
And leave you fo shine, 
Whi!e I lay down my head. 
Oh, soundly l'll sleep, 
Till the sweet morning light : 
Then you will be fading, 
But I shall be bright. 
Yes, while I'm asleep, 
You will play in the sky; 
And when I awake, 
You will close your bright eye. 
--Author unknown 



PRIMEI 55 

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS 

Mother Pig had three little pigs. 
She had hot food for them ail to eat. 
She said to (he first little pig, 
"You must go away, and make a 
house of yotr own.:' 
So the first little pig left home. 
He met a man with some straw. 
"Good-morning, B[r. Man," said 
the little 1)ig. "Please give me 
that straw to make me a bouse." 
So the man gave him the straw. 
Then the little pig ruade a house. 



PRIMER 

The next day Mr. Wolf came along. 
tt e rapped at the door, and said, 
"Little Pig, Little Pig, let me in. 
let me inl" 
"No, no, my good sir, you shall 
neçer corne in I" 
"Then l'll huff and l'Il l»ufi: 
and l'll blow vour house in!" 
So he huffed and he puffed, and 
he blew the house in. Then he 
ate up the poor little pig. 
The second little pig leff home. 
tte met  man vith  bundle of 
stieks.. 
"Please Mr. Man, give me those 
sticks to make me a house." 
So the man gave him the stieks. 
Then the little pig ruade a house. 
The next day Mv. Wolf came along. 
He rapped at the door, and said, 



PRIIER 57 

"Little Pig, Little Pig, let me in, 
let me inl" 
"No, no, my good sir, you shall 
never corne in !" 
"Then l'll huff and l'll puff, 
and l'll blow your house in I" 
So he huffed and he puffed, and 
he blew the house in. Then he 
ate up the poor little pig. 
The third little pig left home. 
He met a man with some bricks. 
"Good-morning, Mr. Man. Please 
give me those bricks to make me 
a bouse." 
So the man gave him the bricks. 
Then the little pig ruade a house.-" 
The next day Mr. Wolf came along. 
He rapped at the door, and said, 
"Little Pig, Little Pig, let me in, 
let me in I" 



'No, no, my ood sir, ou sha|| 
nerer 
"Then l'l! 
and l'll blow voir hose 
o he buffet| and he puffed, and 
he puffed and he huffed. But he 
could not b|ow the bouse in. 
The bricks were too strong. 
Then Mr. Wolf said, "I will jump 
up on the roof. I will julnp down 
the chimney, and eat 3"ou up!'" 
Then the little pig took a big 
kettle. He hung it over the hot tire. 
Ite filled it full of boiling water. 
Then [r. Wolf jumped into the 
ehimney. He fell down, down, down, 
plump into the kettle of hot water! 
Thaç was the end of Mr. Wolf. 

--English 1Nursery Talc 



PRIMER 

ONE THING AT A TIME 

Work vhile you work, 
Play while you play, 
That is the way 
To be happy and gay. 
Whatcvcr you do, 
Do with your might. 
Things done by halvcs 
Are nevcr done right. 
Ont thing at u tiret, 
And that done well, 
Is the best of all rules, 
As many can tcll. 

If you try and try and try, 
And do hot pour or cry, 
You will find by and 1)y 
It is best to try and try. 



0 PRIMER 

THE CAT AND THE BIRD 

"Good-morning, little Bird," said 
Pussy. 
"Good-morning, Pussy,'" said the 
little Bird. 
"Will you fly down to me, little 
Bird ?" said Pussv. 
"Why should I fly clown to you ?" 
said the little B ird. 
"I like a little Bird for m" 
breakfast," said Pussy. 
"A little Bird does hOt like to 
be a breakfast for a Pussy," said 
the Bird, and away he flew. 



PRI.[ER 61 

THE DUCKS A'D THE FROGS 
The ducks were out on the river 
diving for food. Some frogs saw 
them. 
"What funny things ducks are! 
said one frog. "Yes, they have 
only two legs," said another frog. 
"Good-day, Mrs. Duck," said 
another. "Is your home in the 
water ?" 
"No, indeed[" said Mrs. Duck. 
"Our home is at the farm. We 
have a house there. 
ruade it for us.t 

Our Mistress 



PRIMER 

"Why did she make you a house ?" 
said the frog. "She never ruade 
one for us." 
"Why, we lay eggs for her," said 
)Irs. Duck. 
"Well, we lay eggs, too," said the 
frog. 
"¥ou lay your eggs in the water," 
said Mrs. Duck, "but we lay ours in 
out house. Men like to eat out 
eggs, but they do hot care for 
yours. 
"What funny things men are!" 
said the frog, as the duek swam 
awtv. 
"How lucky for us that they are l" 
said another frog, as he dived from 
the bank. 



PRIMER 63 

THE DOG I:N THE 5IANGER 

0ne day in summer a big dog 
went into a stable. 
He saw a manger full of soft hay. 
He crept into it and fcll aslccp. 
An ox who had bccn working 
hard came into the stable. Ho was 
tired and hungry. He wcnt fo the 
manger to eat, but the dog growled 
at him. 
"Do you want to eat the hay?" 
asked the ox. 



64 PRIMER 

"No," growled the dog. "I can't 
eat hay." 
"Then let me eat if," said the ox. 
"I will hot," said the dog. 
"What  mean dog you are !" 
said the ox. "You can't eat it, and 
I can; yet you will not let me eat if." 

WHITE SHEEP 

White sheep, white sheep, 
0na blue h i 1 l, 
When the wind stops, 
You all stand stili. 
Wh en the wind b lows, :i 
You walk away slow....,-. 
White sheep, white sheep, 
Where do you go ? 



PRIMER 65 

THE STORY OF ttENNY PE_Nq  

Henny Penny was walking n a 
garden. A cherry fell 
on her head with a thud.  
"The sky s falling," ,L 
smd Henny Penny. "I 
must run and tell thc Khg." 
As shc ran, she met a Rooster, 
who said, "Where are you gong, 
 Henny Penny?" 
And she cried, "Oh, 
Rooster Poosterl the 
sky is falling, and I 

ara going to tell the King." 
"I will go, too," said Rooster 
Pooster.  
So they ran and tan 
till they met a Turkey 
"Oh, Turkey l 
Lurkêy 



66 PRIMER 

said they, "the sky is falling, and 
we are going to tell the King." 
"I will go with you," said Turkey 
Lurkey. 
So they ran and ran till they met 
"Oh, Fox LoxI" 
said they, "the sky is falling, and 
we are going to tell the King." 
And thc Fox said, "Corne with 
me, Ilenny Penny, Rooster Pooster, 
and Turkey Lurkey. I will show 
)'ou the way to the King's house." 

But they said, 
Loxl we know you. 
So they ran and 

"Oh, no, Fox 

ran, but they 

never found the King's house. 
And the King never knew the 
sky was falling. 



PRIMER 67 

THE GREEDY MAN 

There was once 
a man who had a 
goose. She laid 
an egg every day. 
One day she laid 
a golden egg. 
The man went 
fo town and sold 

the egg. Next day the goose laid 
another golden egg. 
"Wife," said the man, "we shall 
hot be poor any more." 
Every day ho round a golden egg 
and sold it. Soon he was hot con- 
tent with this. 
"Wife," said he, "I shall kill this 
goose and get all the eggs at once." 
So he killed ber, but he round no 
golden eggsl 



8 PRIMER 

ROBII" REDBREAST 

It was early in the morning, and 
Robin sat on the tree top. 
"Çheer-up, cheer-up! cheer-up, 
cheer-upl" he sang. 
The old cat heard him, and crept 
under the tree. She called softly, 
"Robin, Robin Redbreast, 
Singing on the bough, 
Corne and get your breakfast, 
I will feed you now." 



PRIMER 69 

"Tut tut l Tut tut!" said Robin. 
"No, no, Mrs. Puss. I sav 3-ou 
catch a mousc yestcrday, but )-ou 
shall hot catch mc.'L./" 
Thon thc cat tan avay to the 
barn to look for another breakfast. 
Just thon a littlc girl came out to 
hear Robin singing his song. Shc 
threw bread crumbs under the tree 
and said, 
"Robin, Robin Rcdbreast, 
Singing on thc bough, 
Corne and get )Tour breakfast, 
I will feed )-ou now." 
"Chcer-up, checr-up! chcer-up, 
cheer-upI" sang Robin. This was 
his way of saying, "Thank youl 
Thank youI" 
Ho flcw down and had ail the 
breakfast he could eat. 



70 PRIMER 

THE GINGERBREAD BOY 

bread cakes. 
0ne day she 
ruade a cake in 
the shape of a 
boy. She put it 
into the oven to 

Once there was a little old nlan, 
and a little old woman. They lived 
in a little old bouse. 
The old woman ruade ginger- 
When she opened the oven door, 
out juml)ed the Gingerbread Boy, 
and away he tan. 
The little old man tan after him, 
but he could hot catch him. 
The Gingerbread Boy met a big 
man on the road. He said, "I 



PRIMER 71 

have run away ff'oto the little old 
woman. I can run away from you, 
tO0 SO [ can." 
The big man tan after him, but 
he could not catch him. / 
The Gingerbread Boy met a cow. 
He said, "I have run away fronl , 
little old woman and a big man. I 
can run away from you, too. Yes, 
I can." 
The cow tan after him, but she 
could hot catch him. 
Soon the Gingerbread Boy met 
a dog. He said, "I bave run 
away from a little old wonlan, a big 
man, and a cow. I can run away 
from you, too. Yes, I can.'" 
Then the dogran aftcr him. 
The dog tan very ïast and caught 



72 PRIMER 

the Gingerbread Boy. He began 
to eat him. 
The Gingerbread Boy said, 
"Oh, dear! my legs are gone ! 
Oh, dear! my arms are gone! 
Oh, dear! my body is gonel 
Oh, dear! I ara all gone !" 
And he never spoke again. 

East, west, home is best. 



PRIMER 73 

THE BEE 

Buzzl Buzz! This is the song of 
the bee; 
His legs are of yellow, a jolly good 
fellow, 
And yet a great worker is he. 

In days that are sunny 
He's making his honey, 
In days that are cloudy 
He's making his wax. 

Bees don't care 
about the show: 
I can tell you why 
that's so; 
Once I caught 
a little bec, 
Who was much too warm 
for Ino 



74 PRIMER 

THE RATS AND THE EGG 

One day two rats were eating an egg 
in a field. They saw a fox coming 
toward them. 
"The fox will eat our egg," saîd 
one rat. 
"The fox will eat ts, too, if we 
stay here," said the other rat. 
"Now, what shall we do ?" said 
both rats. 
One rat lay down on his back. 
Then he let the other rat place the 



PRIMER 75 

egg between his fcet, take hold of 
his tail, and draw him to the barn 
as fast as he could go. 
The fox was afraid to corne to 
the barn, and the rats had a good 
story fo tell to their fi'icnds. 

THE TOrN MUSICIANS 

The donkey was old, and his toaster 
was about fo sell him. 
"I shall hot be sold," said the 
donkey. "I will run away fo town, 
and join the band." 
Ho met a dog upon thc road. 
"Corne with me to town, and join 
the hand," said he. "You can beat 
the drum." 
"All right," said the dog. 



76 PRIMER 

They met an old cat by the way. 
"Corne with us and help fo make 
music," said they. "We have heard 
you sing." 
"All right," sad the car. 
Farther on, they met a rooster. 
"Corne along and join out hand." 
sad they. 
"All right,'" said the roostcr. ] 
At night they came to a lare 
house in the woods. The donkcv 
looked in through the high vindow. 
IIe saw robbers eating sui)per. 
"I ara so hungry," said the cat. 
"Let us drive the robbers away," 
said the rooster. 
"How shall we do it?" said he 
d,»nkey. 
"Let us frighten them," sad the 
dog. 



PRIIIER 77 

The donkey put his feet upon 
the sill of the window. The dog 
climbed upon his ])ack. The cat 
climbed upon the dog's back. The 
rooster flew up and stood upon the 
cat's head. All looked in through 
the window. 
Then they sang i"ï.. =- '  _.,. _ 
together with ail _.. 
their might. The-...-_ ._ 
k" - 
donkey ]>rayed, the 
dog barked, the cat -- 
mewed, and the 
rooster crowed. It  " 
was a dreadful noise. 
It scared the rob- " 
[ 
bers, who ran away ., 
as fast as they coul( 
The four friends sat clown to 



78 PRIMER 
supper and ate what the robbers 
had left. Then they put out the 
lights and waited. 
An hour later one robber cam 
back. Ite tried to light a candle 
at the coals in the fireplace. The 
coals were the cat's eves. She 
seratched him, the dog bit him, the 
donkey kieked him, and the rooster 
erowed at him. 
He tan away at the toi) of his 
speed. He told the robbers that 
he was never so seared in his liïe. 
This ruade them all af?aid, and they 
never came baek. 
So the four friends ruade a home 
for themselves in that house, and 
never went to town. 



PRIMER 79 

THE LION .D THE IOUSE 

One duy u lion lay asleep in the 
woods. A mouse ran over his nose. 
The lion was about fo eat hi,, 
but the mousc begged hard for his 
life. 
"If you will let me go," he said, 
"I shall never forger you. Some 
duy I may be able fo help you." 
The lion smiled. "Run away, 
little mouse," said he. "I shll hot 
hurt you." 



80 PRIMER 

Some days later hunters put a 
net in the lion's puth. He fell into 
the net, and could hot free himself. 
Thc mouse heard him roar, and 
ran fo him. "I will help you," 
said the mouse, and he began to 
gnaw the ropes. 
It was hard work and slow, but 
at last the ropes fell apart, and the 
lion was free. 
"How can I repay you for what 
you have done ?" said the lion. 
"You spared my life one day," 
said the mouse. "I ara glad that I 
have been able fo save yours." 

Sing a song of winter ; 
Sing u song of spring; 
In summer when the birds are here 
o need u song to sing. 



PRIMEI 81 

  " l  l l I   
Once I saw u ycllow bird on the 
['SS. 
I threw  bt of bread fo 
He looked glad and hopl»cd near. 
He took the bread n his }»cal« 
Then he flew away fo an applc tree. 
He stfll had the bread n hs bcal« 
He flew u to thc toi» of the trce 
where therc was a little nest. 
Five litt]e birds were in thc nest. 
He filled their mouths wJth the 
bread. 
He flew away to another aplc tree. 
There he sang  loud, sweet song 
f0ç e. 



82 PRIMER 

THE LITTLE BLé\  

Once there was a little boy. 
He was only four years old. 
He thought he was now very big. 
0ne day he said, 
"I ara hot little any more. 
I ara alnlost as big as my father. 
See, I can wear my father's bat!" 
Then he put on his father's hat. 
Then he took up his father's cane. 
He went down the street for a walk. 



PRIIIER 83 

The hat came down over his ears 
and eyes. 
The cane was higher than his head. 
As ho walked on, hc felt very happy. 
He was ha'ing a good tilnc. 
All the peoplc laughcd at him. 
One man ealled out, 
"Well, Hat, where is the },,)y?" 
Another lllall ealled out, 
"Well, Cane, where are you going 
with the boy ?" 

THE DADELION 

"0 dandelion, yellow as gold, 
What do you do ail day ?" 
"I just wait here in the long 
green grass 
Till the children corne to play." 



PRIMER 

"0 dandelion, yellow as gold, 
What do you do all night ?" 
"I wait and wait till the cool dew 
falls 
And my hair is long and white.:" 
"What do you do when yotir hair 
grows white 
And the children corne to play?" 
"They take me u l) in their dimpled 
hands 
And blow my hair away." 



PRIME]: 85 

Have you ever seen u bird like 
this? Itis a stork. There are 
many of them in Holland where 
little Hans lives. 
0ne built its nest on the roof of 
Hans' home. It was a great pet, 
and he fedit every day. 
When cold weathcr cornes, birds 
fly away fo where it is warm in 
winter. Hans knew his pet would 
make its winter home in the warm 
south-. He hoped some boy there 
would be kind toit. 



86 PRIMER 

So he wrote a note and tied it 
to the bird's neck. The note said: 
"Please take care of my stork. 
Send it back to me next spring.'" 
Winter came, and the stork flew 
south. When the warln da-s came 
again, Hans watched for his bird 
friend. At last he sw it coming, 
and it had aletter on its neck. 
Hans fed his pet, and then read 
the ]errer. It said: "We cared for 
your stork, and now we send it back. 
The little children in our school 
want books. Can you help lhem?" 
Hans and h]s father ruade up a 
box of books and sent them to the 
little people in the winter home of 
the stork. 



PRIMER 87 

A GIA_NT 

Tom sat before the grate, reading. 
"I wish I could see a giant like 
those in this book," said he. 
"I ara one," said a voice in the 
grate. "Sometimes I am no bigger 
than the head of  match. Some- 
times I ara so big that it takes 
many men to fight me. 
When men control me, I help 
them. I can roast beef, boil eggs, 
and bake bread. With my help 
men can make bricks and glass and 
knives. 
When men let me go free, I 
often destroy houses and barns and 
crops, and even big forests. 
Water is the only thing I ara 
afraid of. Now, who ara I ?" 



88 PRIIER 

This little Indian boy lived in a 
wigwam with his grandmother, So- 
komis. Have you ever seen a 
wigwam? Let me tell you where 
this wigwam wasw 

By the shining Big-Sea-Water, 
Stood the wigwam of Nokomis. 
Dark behind i rose the forest, 
Bright before it bea the water, 
Bea the clear and sunny water, 
Beag the shining Big-Sea-Water. 



PRIMER 89 

01d Nokomis ruade him u little 
cmdle. In it she put a bed of moss 

and rushes. 
used fo say, 
get thee I" 

When he cried, she 
"Hush! the bear will 

The boy learned the names of the 
birds. He lcarncd how they built 
their nests in summcr. He round 
where they hid themselves in winter. 
He learned how to talk with them. 
He called them his chickens. 

He learned-- 

Where the squirrels hid their acorns, 
How the reindeer ran so swiftly, 
Why the rabbit was so timid. 

He talked with them and called 
them his brothers. He lcarnedtheir 
names and all their secrets. 



90 PRIMER 

When he grew older, he was 
given a bow and arrows. He went 
into the woods, but he did hot shoot 
the birds, his chickens. He did hot 
shoot thc sctuirrels or thc rabbits, 
his brothers. 
Ho hid in the bushes till a red 
deer came. The hc shot an arrow, 
and the deer fell dead. He carried 
it home to his grandmother. She 
ruade a feast, and everybody came 
and praised thc boy. 

If you wish to be hal)py 
ll the day, 
,Iakc others happy,-- 
that's the way. 



PRIMER 
EVENIG HYMN 

Now the day is over, 
Night is drawing nigh, 
Shadows of the evening 
Stcal across the sky. 

91 

Now the darkness gathers, 
Stars begin to pccp; 
Birds, and bcasts, and fiowcrs 
Soon will be aslccl). 

Through the lonely darkness 
May the angels sprcad 
Their white wings above me, 
Watching round my head. 

When the morn awakens, 
Then may I arise, 
Pure, and fresh, and sinless, 
In God's holy eyes. 



92 

PRI!ER 

B b 
C c 
D d 
E e 
F f 
G g 
H h 
I i 
J j 
K k 
L 1 
1[ m